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History

1900 | Effects seen at Carbis Bay during gusty E.N.E. winds , dst rising to at least 240 ft

 
These 
aeolian deposits are most strongly developed on the northern coast, where 
large areas are permanently cut off from the operations of the plough. 
The most considerable of these fronts St. Ives Bay, forming the Lelant, 
Phillack, Upton, Gwithian and Godrevy towans. Another extensive 
tract constitutes the Perran Sands, and isolated patches continue as far as 
Newquay. Further to the north the solid rocks forming the promontory 
of Trevose Head are severed by the towans extending from Constantine 
Bay to Perleze Bay, and opposite Padstow a tract of sandhills extends from 
St. Michael to the Dunbar. Smaller patches occur at Gunwalloe and 
along the southern coast.
 read more »

1757/1822 | Submarine forest of Mounts Bay noted by Rev W Borlase, hazel, and to a smaller extent of alder, elm and oak

So far back as the year 1757 the submarine forest of Mounts Bay was 
noted by the Rev. W. Borlase, and was subsequently described by Dr. Boase 
in the year 1822. The latter represents it as buried beneath deposits 
of sand and gravel, the removal of which by the sea is constantly laying 
it bare the outward prolongation of the vegetable bed extending beneath 
the sea. Between Penzance and Newlyn he notes a bed of vegetable 

1 See W. A. E. Ussher on ' The Recent Geology of Cornwall ' (articles reprinted from the Geol. 
Mag.), 1879 > anc * the Post-Tertiary Geology of Cornwall (printed for private circulation), 1879.
 read more »

190801 | Remembering Cunaide | Hayle Pump

Remembering Cunaide

Remembering Cunaide

At some point in the 5th century there was an individual of such high-status, so respected and well thought of, that when they sadly passed away, the normal burial or cremation with little structure to it, such as a mound of earth, was not going to suffice.  read more »

National Explosives, Gwinear-Gwithian - 1463206 | Historic England

Dynamite Towans

From Wikipedia October 01, 2012

In 1888, the National Explosive works were established on Upton Towans (giving it the alternative name "Dynamite Towans"). Originally built to supply the local mining industry, it soon grew to supply the military and, during the First World War, employed over 1500 people. The remote location on the Towans proved a wise move as there were a number of accidents resulting in explosions.

   read more »

190129 | Will the authorities ever learn what causes those Subterranean Hayle Stink Blues?

Will the authorities ever learn what causes those Subterranean Hayle Stink Blues?

Posted By theboss on 29th January 2019

By Graham Smith

It is hardly news that much of West Cornwall is built on top of old mine workings. What makes this old news interesting in 2019 is the reluctance of a host of regulatory and commercial organisations to properly investigate, or understand, the consequences.  read more »

1994 | CETTFS WARBLER - Cettia cetti at Angarrack in 1981 and 1982, but sadly the habitat was destroyed for road and industrial

Cetti's warbler by the Kalloni east river, Lesvos, Greece / Mark S Jobling / CC-BY-SA-3.0

CETTFS WARBLER - Cettia cetti

Scarce resident. Breeds. Uncommon passage migrant.  read more »

1994 | FIRECREST - Regulus ignica, singles at Illogan, Saltash, Angarrack

Uncommon passage migrant (mainly autumn) and winter visitor. A potential breeding species (cf. probable breeding in Devon since 1985).  read more »

1716 | Sale of BlackTin from Wheal Hermon, St Just to Angarrack Smelting House

Possibly named after a mountain in the Holy Land, where the river Jordan rises, this mine
has the distinction of being the oldest named mine in Cornwall to appear on a map, a
map from about 1560 at Hatfield House. In 1584 Norden marked it on his map of Penwith
Hundred, but without a name, as was his custom at the time. Situated at Porthnanven on
the southern side of the Cot or Kelynack Valley and extending a short way down the coast,
the mine has never had a change of name in the four and a quarter centuries of its existence,
apart from variants in spelling, though at one time it was worked with its neighbours Letcha
(late Cornish for a frying-pan) which adjoins it to the east, and Oak, adjoining Hermon
on the cliffs to the south.  read more »

144-inch-diameter cylinder, powering eight beams, used to drain Haarlemmermeer in the Netherlands Cruquius station

Francis Harvey, Jebus Bickle (an important figure at Harvey's who came from a large family of engineers) and the foreman Billy Gilbert
Back of Cruquiusmuseum, showing the beams of the pumping engine and the 9 meter drop in water level from the Spaarne river

Harvey & Co. of Hayle was responsible for producing the world's largest ever beam engine. With a 144-inch- diameter cylinder, powering eight beams, it was used to drain the Haarlemmermeer in the Netherlands and has been preserved at the Museum De Cruquius (above). The three men shown stood with a miscast of the gigantic cylinder are Francis Harvey, Jebus Bickle (an important figure at Harvey's who came from a large family of engineers) and the foreman Billy Gilbert.  read more »

190130 | Cornwall Council admits defeat and calls for help in bid to solve the Hayle underground water mystery

Cornwall Council admits defeat and calls for help in bid to solve the Hayle underground water mystery

Posted By theboss on 30th January 2019

By Graham Smith  read more »

1824 | It is related that very great alarm was occasioned at St. Ives on the first appearance of a steamer on the coast

October 15, 1824. — Arrived a steam vessel, which went for Hayle.*


* It is related that very great alarm was occasioned at St. Ives on
the first appearance of a steamer on the coast. It was thought to
be a vessel on fire, and boats were manned to go out to her
assistance ; but on her coming nearer she was discovered to be a
steam vessel, which went into Hayle.

1824 November 10 | Some houses on the beach were unroofed, windows broken, and cellar-doors forced open by the violence of the w

1824 November 10 -- Wind N.E., a very heavy gale, with a tremendous sea ; damage to shipping trivial, but some houses on the beach were unroofed, windows broken, and cellar-doors forced open by the violence of the waves. The sea broke at intervals into the churchyard, the graves were levelled, and two head-stones washed down.

1826 | The schooner Polmanter began to load alongside St. Ives Quay the first cargo of copper-ore ever shipped from this port

1826

April 12. — The L Ocean ran on shore on the Eastern 
Spits, and filled with water; crew saved. The pilot, 
Richard Grenfell, received an injury. 

April 13. — The L! Ocean discharged 100 tons logwood 
into Hayle barges. Her repairs at St. Ives, previous 
to her loss, cost £1,249 17s. 6d. The wreck has been 
sold for £205. 

 

May 12 --The schooner Polmanter began to load alongside St. 
Ives Quay the first cargo of copper-ore ever shipped 
from this port direct from a mine. This cargo is from 
Wheal Trenwith. 
 
May 27. — Mackerel selling 3d. each ; butter in Pen- 
zance market io^d, and beef 7d. per pound ; barley 16s., 
wheat 27s., potatoes us. per bushel.  

   read more »

1822 | The people at Hayle called out the Yeoman Cavalry for trading in copper-ore at 4s. per ton

1822

May 14. — The Captains of the colliers trading to this 
port, Hayle and Portreath, formed a combination not 
to carry copper-ore for less than 5s. per ton, or to sell 
coals from Wales for less than 50s. per way (16s. 8d. 
per ton). 

May 20. — The sailors at Hayle dismantled Captain 
Sargeant's vessel for trading in copper-ore at 4s. per 
ton, on which account the people at Hayle called out 
the Yeoman Cavalry. 

Velling-Varine, Sunday 8 August 1743 | Charles Wesley

According to 

The Wesleys in Cornwall, 1743–1789: A Record of Their Activities Town by Town

By Samuel J.
 read more »
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